Royal Buildings

Britain loves a royal wedding. Street parties, the Red Arrows, sausage rolls, triangular sandwiches, a tombola. And of course, bunting! But what about the hosting royal wedding? Of course, Westminster Abbey is the most famous venue for royal ceremonies, but there are many more buildings that are connected with royalty. 

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Winchester Cathedral

One of the largest Gothic cathedrals in Europe, Winchester Cathedral and the city have an intimate connection with royalty. Winchester was the seat of the Saxon Kings of Wessex, and royal ceremonies took place in the church. Several kings were buried in the Old Minster. When the Normans invaded in 1066, they recognised the importance of city and church, and were quick to build a Cathedral in the city.

Winchester Cathedral, Winchester
York Minster

York Minster

York has an ancient connection with Kings: the first recorded church on the site was a hurriedly built wooden church that was thrown together to baptise Edwin, the King of Northumbria in 627.

York Minster
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The Chapel Royal

The most senior royal palace in Britain, St James' Palace has strong connections with several of British royal families. Built by Henry VIII, it was turned into a barracks by Oliver Cromwell before becoming the birthplace of many of the Stuart monarchs. At the heart is the Chapel Royal, which was built around 1540 and has witnessed many marriages.

Royal Chapel, St James Palace
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St George's Chapel

St George's Chapel has a very strong connection with the Royal Family. Built by King Edward III in the 14th century, it has hosted many royal weddings and ceremonies, and is the burial place of 11 different monarchs, including Charles I, Henry VI and Henery VII.

St George's Chapel